Archived
A collection of miscellaneous artwork and commentary from different styles and periods since Post-Renaissance.
Each post contains a brief explanation.
Archived
+
Self Portrait, 1790, Élisabeth Louise Vigée-Lebrun
The earlier frivolous Rococo style of Vigée-Lebrun slowly shifted, and in her later career she utilized a more naturalist style. In this portrait she is shown confident as the artist, painting a portrait for nobility [Marie Antoinette], remarkably different from the idle poses of the Rococo style. Note that in actuality, those would not be the artist clothes that she wore—this is an artistic account of her creative process.
This portrait also caused a minor scandal, because she showed herself to be smiling with her teeth showing, striking different from the other portrayals of female emotions at the time.
+
Self Portrait in a Straw Hat, 1782, Élisabeth Louise Vigée-Lebrun
One of many self portraits.
+
Portrait of Marie Antoinette, 1783, Élisabeth Louise Vigée-Lebrun
Marie Antoinette was so pleased by Lebrun’s portrait of her that in the 6 years that followed, she would commission more than 30 portraits from Lebrun of her and her family.
+
Portrait of Marie Louis O’Murphy, 1752, Francois Boucher
+
Renaud and Armide, 1734, Francois Boucher
Boucher excelled in painting classical, mythological scenes that are rich with decorative details and allegories representing the arts. Very voluptuous.
Artwork [during this period] was regarded frequently as a kind of two-dimensional furniture. The interior of that time featured the same richness.
+
L’Enseigne de Gersaint,1720, Jean-Antoine Watteau
This is one of his last paintings. It shows both the portrait of Louis XIV and the artist’s own artworks being packed away, implying his belief that he will not be remembered.
+
In 1721, Watteau created a repetition of his 1717 painting Pilgrimage to the Isle of Cythera, making it more embellished, vibrant, and sensuous.
The short artistic life (died at age 36) of Jean-Antoine Watteau, left him known for scenes of bucolic and idyllic charm, with just a hint of theatricality.
+
Pilgrimage to the Isle of Cythera,1717, Antoine Watteau
Fête galante paintings showed outdoor amusements of the French upper-class. The gentleness in shapes, general frivolousness, and theme of love was appealing to the Rococo taste. Cythera is the mythological land of love and eternal youth.
+
Rococo: The term derived from a word meaning “petals”, characterized by softness, brightness, and flamboyant design.
+
Summary of Baroque.